June 25, 2020
Alcohol - a Stimulant or Depressant

Is Alcohol a Stimulant or Depressant?

Depending on your specific situation, you may not readily be able to tell if alcohol is a stimulant or a depressant. Drinking alcohol brings about a myriad of emotions for people. Some people feel peppy and uppity, while others struggle with anxiety and depression. Scientifically, alcohol is a depressant, but it is more complicated than that. Alcohol enhances the mood you are already in for most people. If you were happy before you started drinking, you may be excited and giddy when you drink. However, if you were sullen or angry before you had a drink, that mood may only get worse. The only way to stop alcohol from controlling the mood you show everyone else is to stop drinking altogether. Is Alcohol a Stimulant? Alcohol does have some stimulating effects. Many people who drink wind up with higher heart rates and lower inhibitions, making them appear to be more energetic. However, that is not a simple way of defining what alcohol does to the body. Instead, it is just some of the effects that some people go through whenever they have a drink in their system. Alcohol will speed you up for a short time after having a drink, giving you a tiny bit of energy. However, once you settle into your second or third drink, the depressant effects begin to kick in. Your body will slow, which is why falling asleep is so easy when you have been drinking. Is Alcohol a Depressant?
June 22, 2020
How Long Does Alcohol Stay in Your System

How Long Does Alcohol Stay in Your System?

Finding out how long alcohol can stay in your system is a common question. After all, you do not want to risk trying to drive if there is still any alcohol left in your system. Unfortunately, the answer depends on many different factors. You need to measure how much you were drinking, the proof of the alcohol, and your body size as starters. How well your kidneys and liver function also factor into how long alcohol can stay in your system. Then there is the factor of how old you are, whether you are male or female, and if you ate anything before or while drinking. Thankfully, there is a pretty good rule to follow should drinking be a part of your regular routine. Most people will have no residual alcohol left after 2-4 hours if they were drinking a can or two of beer in that time. Anything more than that, the time goes up exponentially. The best way to be sure that there is never any alcohol in your system is to stop drinking. That way, any time you need to go out, you know it is safe to do so without putting yourself, or anyone else around you, at risk.
June 18, 2020
Scared to get sober

3 Most Common Fears That People Have Before Getting Clean & Sober

There are certain people who aren’t able to drink. They can’t handle alcohol. Maybe you are one of the people who get out of control when you drink. You might feel the need to drink to handle a trauma from your past. Maybe alcohol & drugs negatively affect every aspect of your life. If this is the case, you are not alone. There are millions of others just like you. Now it is up to you to decide whether you are going to get sober. This can be scary. Many people have fears that keep them from getting sober. Knowing more about these fears might give you the boost that you need to start your sobriety and recovery journey in Florida. 1. You Won’t Have Fun in Your Life Once You Are Sober Many people believe that they won’t have any fun in their life once they are sober. This is a fear that many alcoholics & addicts have. The problem is that you can’t keep drinking. When you think about it, the “fun” that you have when you are drunk is not real fun at all. It is an imagined type of fun that you tell yourself you are having so that you can continue drinking. Once you wake up with a hangover or after doing something that you regret, you realize that the drunk lifestyle is not actually fun.
June 7, 2020
Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Auditory, Visual or Tactile Hallucinations

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Auditory, Visual or Tactile Hallucinations?

Anyone who has struggled with the idea of giving up alcohol, often says they struggled due to fear. What most people fear is not knowing what their alcohol withdrawal experience will be like. The truth is, each person going through alcohol withdrawals have a unique experience. It depends on how long they drank, how much they drank, and several other factors. Those who drank for a long time or drank a lot of alcohol regularly seem to have the most severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can sometimes include hallucinations. To find out more, read on. The Types of Hallucinations Caused By Alcohol Withdrawals Let us start by making sure that you know that alcohol withdrawals is something you do not want to go through alone. Ideally, everyone who gives up drinking alcohol after even a slight addiction should do so under medical supervision. Typically, the hallucinations that some people experience are part of the reason why this is so necessary.
June 7, 2020
Alcohol Withdrawal Blood Presssure Heart Rate

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Increased Heart Rate and/or Increased Blood Pressure?

Since alcohol withdrawal can be rough on your body, it is best to have an idea of things to do to keep your heart rate and blood pressure down. Make a list before even going to alcohol detox or rehab, if you can.
May 28, 2020
Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Headaches

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Headaches?

What Types of Symptoms Often Accompany Alcohol Withdrawals? While the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal vary greatly between individuals, there are some common effects that many people experience. Here are some of the more common effects that come with stopping the consumption of alcohol. Headaches that range from mild to migraine-like Anxiety that can range from a slight nuisance to all-encompassing Struggles with getting to sleep or staying asleep Stomach upset, which may also include diarrhea and/or vomiting Hallucinations can happen in anyone, but typically happen with those who have consumed considerable amounts of alcohol in their lifetime Sweating that does not seem to stop even when the person cools off Mild shakes that can make sitting still difficult Most symptoms of alcohol withdrawal begin by the time the person hits 24 hours without a drink. In most cases, these symptoms subside within 5-7 days. However, in some of the more serious instances, these effects can go on for much longer. Some patients have actually struggled with some of these symptoms for weeks after their last drink.