A Guide to Helping Someone with Addiction & Depression

How do you help someone with addiction and depression? Everyone’s circumstance will be different, but knowing what you’re up against will be a great start. The phrase “Knowledge is power” is certainly true in this case. Facing the battle well-armed, you will be of more assistance to that person.

Drug addiction and depression often go hand in hand. This dual diagnosis makes everything more complicated because one may affect the other. If a depressed person is left untreated, they may find themselves reaching for coping mechanisms and self medicate to help them deal with this issue. Their depression brings the possibility of an addiction of some kind; drug addiction is a common one. When an individual is addicted to drugs, it can affect their mental and emotional stability and cause depression. What they are doing to soothe themselves can escalate their issues and even trigger new ones.

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Nausea?

Withdrawing from alcohol, whether from a night of binge drinking or a longtime addiction, often results in the human body rebelling in a variety of ways. Excessive alcohol intake and long-term alcohol use affect nearly every system in the body. The effects, both psychological and physiological, can range from short-term to long-term and also mild to severe.

Many people have experienced the stereotypical hangover. After a night of excessive drinking, the body makes its displeasure known. These symptoms often appear the next morning but can start the same night as the alcohol intake. A hangover can be felt throughout the whole body with a general sense of fatigue, aches and pains, headache, dizziness, light and sound sensitivity, and a myriad of gastrointestinal problems. More than anything the body needs time to rid itself of the alcohol and to re-hydrate. In cases of extremely excessive alcohol consumption, medical attention and intervention may be required.

Top 10 Ways My Life Got Better Without Alcohol and Drugs

As it relates to alcoholics and addicts, our drug of choice was at one time one of the greatest discoveries we had ever made. Anxieties were eased, fears diminished and sometimes even just existing in our own skin was somehow more manageable. However, as the story always goes, it works until it doesn’t anymore. Though I still had it in my head that getting sober was the end of all things enjoyable for me, I can honestly say that my life has turned around in ways I never thought possible.

1. Self Acceptance
First and most importantly, I can look myself in the mirror. It’s no secret that addiction is a monster that transforms some of the most beautiful lives into chaos and ruin; I certainly found it to be true. I no longer recognized who I was anymore and what I did see flat out disgusted me. Getting sober felt like losing an old friend, I’ll admit, but in the process, I found myself and that gain is immeasurable.