Post-Acute Withdrawal Syndrome (PAWS): Symptoms, Treatment & Types

When most people think of drug and alcohol withdrawal, they probably picture the initial withdrawal symptoms that occur when a person stops using drugs or alcohol and undergoes the detox process. While these initial withdrawal symptoms can be unpleasant and intense, another form of withdrawal comes later. According to the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, a second form of withdrawal, called post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS), includes symptoms that occur for several weeks or even months after a person stops using drugs and alcohol. Other names for this condition include post-withdrawal syndrome, prolonged withdrawal syndrome, or protracted withdrawal syndrome, and it most often occurs with alcohol, benzodiazepine, and opiate abuse.

Symptoms of Post-Acute Withdrawal

Post-acute withdrawal symptoms may vary based upon the substance from which a person is withdrawing. According to a report in CNS Drugs, post-acute withdrawal syndrome for alcohol typically involves the following symptoms:

Nutritional and Vitamin Therapy is Essential in Alcohol Detox and Alcoholism Recovery

Imagine this: you have a few drinks with some friends and you have a great night. You do this again every weekend. Every weekend turns into weekdays, sometimes with your friends and sometimes in your living room alone. Some days, you start drinking in the morning to get your day started and suddenly, you can’t live without a drink in your hand.

More than 75,000 deaths annually are attributed to the excessive consumption of alcohol, according to Ralph W. Hingson, a Professor at the Boston University School of Public Health. Excessive Alcohol Consumption is also the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States.

Alcoholism (AUD) is a chronic disease characterized by the inability to control drinking due to both a physical and emotional dependence on alcohol. Those who struggle with alcoholism feel as though they cannot function normally without alcohol. In turn, this affects their professional goals, personal matters, and the family and friends in their lives.

Does Alcohol Withdrawal Cause Auditory, Visual or Tactile Hallucinations?

Anyone who has struggled with the idea of giving up alcohol, often says they struggled due to fear. What most people fear is not knowing what their alcohol withdrawal experience will be like. The truth is, each person going through alcohol withdrawals have a unique experience. It depends on how long they drank, how much they drank, and several other factors. Those who drank for a long time or drank a lot of alcohol regularly seem to have the most severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can sometimes include hallucinations. To find out more, read on.

The Types of Hallucinations Caused By Alcohol Withdrawals

Let us start by making sure that you know that alcohol withdrawals is something you do not want to go through alone. Ideally, everyone who gives up drinking alcohol after even a slight addiction should do so under medical supervision. Typically, the hallucinations that some people experience are part of the reason why this is so necessary.

Exercise and Addiction Recovery: 9 Benefits + Exercise Tips

If you have made the decision to detox from drugs & alochol, the process can seem daunting. Withdrawal symptoms and cravings can make it difficult to stay on course with detox and recovery. For many going through detox from drugs & alcohol, there is a need to fill the void left by substances. Recent data suggests that exercise can help remove toxins from the body, lessen stress, and improve overall health during and after drug detox. While it is always best to consult your doctor for specific guidance and advice regarding drug detox, you can keep reading for some tips on exercising during detox.

Benefits of Exercise for Drug Detox

Exercise is good for you – we all know that. But for individuals struggling with drug addiction or going through detox, exercise can have a wide range of benefits beyond weight management or building muscle. Incorporating exercise into your daily routine can help your body heal from substance abuse while naturally detoxing.

5 Stages of Change in Recovery: When Things Begin To Get Better

When living an addictive lifestyle, there are many things that your addiction can take from you. The addiction you have can take away your dignity, relationships, career, and so much more. Some people will hit rock bottom and realize they need to turn their lives around, while others will decide one day that they need to make a change to their life.

No matter what got you to the point of realizing that you need to recover from your addiction, you are here today. You may have just decided to get clean and sober. You may be in your first 24 hours of recovery or you may have been in recovery for a while. Regardless, you are looking to find out when things will get better. It is different for everyone who is recovering from addiction – as this is an individualized process – but there is some information that might be able to help you get the answers you are looking for.