Pros And Cons Of Going To An Alcohol Detox Facility Close To Home

Have you decided to get sober? If so, that is one step in the right direction and you should be extremely proud of yourself. Now, you will need to decide whether you should go to an alcohol detox facility that is close to home or one that is farther away. There are many pros and cons of going to an alcohol detox program that is closer to your home. Learning about these pros and cons can help you to decide what detox facility you should go to when beginning your sobriety and recovery journey.

Pros of Going to an Alcohol Detox Facility Close to Home

If you are thinking about going to an alcohol detox facility that is closer to your home, there are some benefits of doing this that you should know about.

Loved Ones Are Closer to Support You Through This Journey

One of the benefits of attending an alcohol detox program closer to your home is that your loved ones will be closer, so they can support you better through the journey of sobriety and recovery. Knowing that your loved ones are closer can motivate you to get sober and stay sober. Just knowing that they are close-by if you need them to come and see you is a plus. While you might not be able to see your loved ones during the beginning of inpatient alcohol abuse treatment, after some time, they should be able to see you during visiting or family hours.

woman thinks about the alcohol withdrawal timeline

Alcohol Withdrawal Timeline

When a person comes to a doctor’s office, two things will point toward a diagnosis of alcohol withdrawal: the first is long-term alcohol use with sudden cessation, and the second being symptoms typical of withdrawal (these will be explained in the following paragraphs). For the symptoms, physicians use a largely accepted algorithm known as the CIWA-Ar (Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment) protocol. This survey takes a snapshot of a patient to determine how severe their withdrawal is at a point in time during their visit.

What doctors look for when determining severity of alcohol withdrawal: The categories assessed by the patient include nausea and vomiting, tremor (often in the hands), auditory, tactile or visual hallucinations, sweats, anxiety, headache, agitation, and disorientation. Additionally, the doctor will measure heart rate, blood pressure, and do a physical exam. Each category is measured out of 7 points, with 7 being the worst (the exception to this is disorientation, which is measured out of 4 points). The maximum score in the assessment is a 67, with patients under 10 usually being safe without medication, and with any number over 20 being considered severe withdrawal. However, this scale is meant to determine the severity of withdrawal, and is not as helpful in laying out a timeline of when these symptoms will present. For that, it is more helpful to understand the body’s reaction to the cessation of alcohol use.

woman deals with alcohol in her system

How Long Does Alcohol Stay in Your System?

Finding out how long alcohol can stay in your system is a common question. After all, you do not want to risk trying to drive if there is still any alcohol left in your system. Unfortunately, the answer depends on many different factors. You need to measure how much you were drinking, the proof of the alcohol, and your body size as starters. How well your kidneys and liver function also factor into how long alcohol can stay in your system. Then there is the factor of how old you are, whether you are male or female, and if you ate anything before or while drinking.

Thankfully, there is a pretty good rule to follow should drinking be a part of your regular routine. Most people will have no residual alcohol left after 2-4 hours if they were drinking a can or two of beer in that time. Anything more than that, the time goes up exponentially. The best way to be sure that there is never any alcohol in your system is to stop drinking. That way, any time you need to go out, you know it is safe to do so without putting yourself, or anyone else around you, at risk.

Methadone: Treatment, Withdrawal, Abuse, Uses, Side Effects & Dose

What is Methadone?

Methadone is a prescription medication that seems to have received more attention in recent years. According to experts writing for the Western Journal of Medicine, methadone belongs to the opiate class of drugs, and it is comparable to morphine. This prescription medication does have legitimate medical uses and is safe and effective when people use it as a doctor prescribes it, but for some people, it may become addictive and dangerous.

Medical Uses of Methadone

What is methadone used for? One of the most common uses of methadone is for the long-term treatment of addiction to opiates like heroin. Methadone is used as a maintenance medication to help people remain abstinent from heroin and other opiates. It promotes abstinence because it has long-lasting effects and stops the unpleasant symptoms of opiate withdrawal; methadone also reduces heroin cravings and stops people from feeling high if they do take heroin, per the authors writing for the Western Journal of Medicine.

Is Alcoholism Genetic?

It is exceedingly rare that someone in Western society will have gone through their life without this being presented as a question. In fact, it is one of the more often debated subjects in addiction. It is clear that as a country we the United States have not given the mental health field the dedicated studying it deserves, and our rate of mental health issues and addiction correspond to this fact.

The question is: How does the fall into addiction happen to some and not to others?

Predisposition to alcoholism has been a much researched topic in both psychological and medical fields, and seems to be correlated somewhat to how much stress someone experiences as baseline. Most of this research that involves intervention has been performed on non-human models. A study performed in 1990 using rhesus monkeys showed that more anxious monkeys were predisposed to increased alcohol consumption. However, when stress was induced in the monkeys by separation, they would increase their intake to the same levels as the naturally anxious monkeys.