How Can I Support My Nutrition During Heroin Detox?

Nutrition is an important part of our everyday life and is especially critical for those who are working to escape the grips of heroin addiction. Heroin use can take a major toll on the human body, mentally, physically, emotionally, and nutritionally. Consequently, supplementing one’s nutrition properly is an important aspect of the recovery process and should not be overlooked.

The human body’s ability to function is dependant on the presence of key nutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and water. If the body does not receive an adequate amount of these nutrients, then the physiological effects can start to be observed in as little as days or weeks. In regards to water intake, even going 1 day without it can cause noticeable effects.

Suboxone for Opioid Addiction Treatment – Benefits & Risks

Heroin is a highly addictive substance and use carries a number of risks including overdose and contracting communicable diseases. In an effort to reduce the number of overdoses and the spread of untreatable communicable diseases associated with the use of heroin and other opioids, pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs that interact with the brain similarly to opiates but do not carry the same risks. Suboxone is the brand name for one of the pharmaceutical drugs used for opioid addiction treatment.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication that is a combination of 2 different substances: buprenorphine and naloxone. These substances react with the same receptors in the brain as opioid drugs. Naloxone will block the opioid receptors and prevent an overdose where buprenorphine will suppress cravings and limit the euphoric high associated with opiate use. When someone takes Suboxone they will essentially get a high that is less than heroin or fentanyl, they will not have the same cravings, and they will be much less likely to overdose. There is also a limit to the euphoric effects of suboxone so taking more will not produce a greater high. This removes the benefits of abusing the drug.

The Heroin Journey

“What’s going to happen to me?” It’s one of the most common questions we hear when the heroin addiction treatment process is in its beginning moments. And that makes perfect sense! Something that your body depends on to feel “good” and “normal” isn’t going to be available anymore. What does that mean for you? What will your body and mind go through? And what does a treatment facility do to help in that process?

While everyone’s treatment journey is unique, a few generalities exist. These include things that can be highlighted to help answer some of those burning questions about your journey from addiction to recovery, and what happens in between.

Why You Shouldn’t Try to Handle Your Heroin Addiction by Yourself

No matter how many times you tell yourself that you can quit on your own, getting over a heroin addiction isn’t that easy. Even when you think you’ve quit, you may fall back into substance abuse. If you have an addiction, you have a disease. And the only way to cure that disease is through professional treatment.

All You Need To Know About Heroin Addiction

Made from morphine, heroin is an illegal drug. Just like cocaine and morphine, is one of the top leading opiates and is abused by millions across the country. Just after one use, you can become highly addictive. Heroin can be smoked, snorted and even injected into the bloodstream.

What Are The Signs of Opiate Addiction?

If you’re not familiar with opiates, they can be taken in different forms. One form can be prescribed by doctors to treat medical conditions, but it can also be found on the streets in illegal forms. Opiates can range from legal pills like Vicodin and OxyContin to illegal substances like heroin. Regardless of the source and method of intake, the symptoms of opiate addiction are often similar.

What Are the Symptoms of Opioid Addiction

It’s not always obvious when someone has an opioid addiction. Doctors use an 11-point checklist to figure out if there is an underlying problem to someone’s opioid use and if it’s time to go to a detox facility. Since the signs aren’t always clear, it’s important to take any strange habits or suspicions very seriously.

Opioid Addiction Checklist

Based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, if someone experiences at least two of the symptoms on the checklist within the past year, they most likely have an addiction to opioids.