Detoxing from Alcohol at Home

As of 2018, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reported that 15 million people in the United States have alcohol use disorder. As a chronic and relapsing brain disease, alcohol use disorder, or AUD, involves the compulsive use of alcohol, a loss of control over the amount of alcohol taken in, and an emotional state that is negative when not using alcohol.

Whether a person faces binge drinking, heavy drinking, or dependency on alcohol, it is very difficult to overcome an AUD. However, it is also extremely important for that person’s health and wellbeing. Unfortunately, quitting is not an easy process, and people who drink a considerable amount of alcohol are at risk of experiencing withdrawal symptoms.

Some people looking to overcome an alcohol use disorder choose to detox from alcohol at home. While this may be the only option for some, it is not the recommended method according to Alcohol.org, a resource from the American Addiction Centers. Keep reading to learn more about alcohol detox at home.

Alcohol Addiction and Covid-19

Many of us have been spending a bit more time on social media lately. Those of us that have will no doubt recognize the memes and posts jokingly pointing out the increased drinking that our friends, families, and coworkers are splashing all over their walls and feeds. While a lot of that is meant in jest, pointing out the frustrations that rise from boredom and the like, it does highlight yet another side effect of this Coronavirus pandemic – that addiction is taking hold in places that it never would have had this Covid-19 crisis not happened.

The Rise of Boredom & It’s Affect on Addicts

Boredom. It’s a slippery slope, especially for addicts. It begins as something not so horrid, easily bypassed; but it can quickly turn into something that will destroy goals and ruin a solid mind. And when that boredom is forced upon you by authorities beyond your control, it can become unbearable.

Now, Compass Detox is open and ready to help guide you or your loved ones successfully through an addiction crisis. We can help you defeat that monster today! But, what if you’re not quite to that point yet. You feel boredom, and maybe loneliness, becoming a bit too much to handle, but you’re not in crisis mode just yet.

Well, this is the situation that this blog is geared toward today.

No More Fix: A Drug Addict’s Crisis

As more and more parts of our nation move into “stay at home” orders and normal movement becomes difficult, law enforcement and National Guard presence become much more prominent, and all of the other bits of loveliness that can come along with a crisis, daily life and habits are thrown into disarray.

A favorite restaurant for Friday night dinner is no longer open. A little thrift store that always has amazing treasures sits dark and empty. A park that was great for a run or walk is roped off. Life as you know it is different right now, and there are a million examples of how different it is. Some of them not so savory.

For addicts who are in the grip of their addiction, these tighter controls, increased law enforcement presence, and new travel restrictions can mean that their sources for supplying their drug of choice have run dry as well.

Success After Addiction

Addiction can quickly become a spiral of anger and hopelessness. Breaking its grip on your life can seem like an impossible task. Depression, anxiety, and an attitude of “who cares anymore” can quickly seep in and ruin an addict’s drive to succeed in the battle for sobriety. It can seem like the world is against you and, more than that, your own body is against you. And it can seem like beating addiction is pointless, because what happens on the other side? Life has already fallen completely apart, what happens when sobriety hits – then what? Life is still broken into pieces around you, so why even try?

Every addict shares some or all of those emotions. And no matter how supported an addict is, or how many fellow addicts surround them, the battle to achieve sobriety can be a very lonely one.

That is when the need for examples comes into play. People often point to the famous. Robert Downey, Jr., Eminem, Elton John, Demi Lovato. All of these popular names, and many more, have defeated addiction and gone on to claim fortune and fame. But this is just the tip of the iceberg.

Coronavirus in Florida

Coronavirus is huge in the news these days. And people are understandably concerned. Where should you avoid going? Are large groups OK? Is it safe to be outside? Inside? How do you protect yourself with something that is such a massive mystery at the moment?

As Florida reports its first two confirmed cases of the Covid-19 strand of Coronavirus, and Governor DeSantis declares a state of emergency for the Sunshine State, we wanted to get ahead of this virus a bit and reassure our clients, both current and future, as well as their families, that we are monitoring the situation very closely and are more than prepared to keep our staff and clients safe.

In fact, our staff is a major reason that the Coronavirus will not be a major concern here at our facility.

The Battle for Sober

There is nothing easy about addiction. You struggle as you fall into its grip, it tears apart your life once you’re there, it will be one of the biggest fights of your life as you climb out of it, and staying sober? That is a daily battle.

You can battle it and overcome it, of that there is no doubt. At Compass we’ve seen the depths of addiction and how hard it is to come out of it. Those depths can be crazy and dark, but there is one part of addiction that stands out above the rest as truly “hard”. Time and time again, when asked what the hardest part of addiction and recovery is, addicts continue to point toward one event: admitting that you have a problem in the first place.

Addiction and LGBTQ+

Life is hard. Even for the most successful amongst us, those with the biggest smiles and best careers, life can be tumultuous. Addicts know this all too well. It is one of our most often repeated mantras here at Compass – anyone can become addicted to drugs or alcohol. That means the officer who patrols your streets, the doctor who cares for your family, the pastor of your church, your therapist; anyone.

For people like that, untreated addiction can be a never ending torment. Not only is their body and mind under the control of a substance that is tearing them apart, but if that fact is ever found out, their professional, and in many cases personal, lives could come crashing down around them. One segment of the addict population that knows the horrid shock of that situation all too well is the LGBTQ+ community. For this community, simply being “outed” before they are ready can result in life altering repercussions.