man thinks about the stigmas surrounding addiction

How You Can Reshape the Perception of Addiction

It’s essential to reshape the perception of addiction. In the past, those with substance abuse disorders had to live with the stigmas associated with addiction. We understand that addiction is a disease, and proper treatment can result in higher recovery rates. At Compass Detox in South Florida, our patients receive care, attention, and medical assistance…

woman manages her alcohol cravings

Five Ways to Manage Alcohol Cravings

Alcohol cravings are one of the most prevalent symptoms during alcohol detox and well beyond. These cravings can occur during any stage of an alcohol use disorder, appearing first as alcohol addiction is setting in and lasting even years after alcohol detox. Over time, the alcohol cravings become further apart and disappear for months or…

man wonders if alcohol is a stimulant or depressant

Is Alcohol a Stimulant or Depressant?

Depending on your specific situation, you may not readily be able to tell if alcohol is a stimulant or a depressant. Drinking alcohol brings about a myriad of emotions for people. Some people feel peppy and uppity, while others struggle with anxiety and depression. Scientifically, alcohol is a depressant, but it is more complicated than that. Alcohol enhances the mood you are already in for most people. If you were happy before you started drinking, you may be excited and giddy when you drink. However, if you were sullen or angry before you had a drink, that mood may only get worse. The only way to stop alcohol from controlling the mood you show everyone else is to stop drinking altogether.

Is Alcohol a Stimulant?

Alcohol does have some stimulating effects. Many people who drink wind up with higher heart rates and lower inhibitions, making them appear to be more energetic. However, that is not a simple way of defining what alcohol does to the body. Instead, it is just some of the effects that some people go through whenever they have a drink in their system. Alcohol will speed you up for a short time after having a drink, giving you a tiny bit of energy. However, once you settle into your second or third drink, the depressant effects begin to kick in. Your body will slow, which is why falling asleep is so easy when you have been drinking.

Is Alcohol a Depressant?

woman thinks about the alcohol withdrawal timeline

Alcohol Withdrawal Timeline

When a person comes to a doctor’s office, two things will point toward a diagnosis of alcohol withdrawal: the first is long-term alcohol use with sudden cessation, and the second being symptoms typical of withdrawal (these will be explained in the following paragraphs). For the symptoms, physicians use a largely accepted algorithm known as the CIWA-Ar (Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment) protocol. This survey takes a snapshot of a patient to determine how severe their withdrawal is at a point in time during their visit.

What doctors look for when determining severity of alcohol withdrawal: The categories assessed by the patient include nausea and vomiting, tremor (often in the hands), auditory, tactile or visual hallucinations, sweats, anxiety, headache, agitation, and disorientation. Additionally, the doctor will measure heart rate, blood pressure, and do a physical exam. Each category is measured out of 7 points, with 7 being the worst (the exception to this is disorientation, which is measured out of 4 points). The maximum score in the assessment is a 67, with patients under 10 usually being safe without medication, and with any number over 20 being considered severe withdrawal. However, this scale is meant to determine the severity of withdrawal, and is not as helpful in laying out a timeline of when these symptoms will present. For that, it is more helpful to understand the body’s reaction to the cessation of alcohol use.

You Are Not Addicted to Alcohol. Unless…

Alcohol is the most commonly consumed addictive substance around the globe, and it’s becoming a bigger problem every day. Estimates are that more than 17 million people suffer from alcohol addiction globally. Several million people engage in binge drinking almost daily.

It’s hard to recognize the exact point when drinking alcohol becomes an addiction, but here are a few signs to help figure out whether you or someone you love have a drinking problem.

Physical signs of alcoholism

Are you (or someone close to you) shaking, sweating and feeling nauseous when you don’t drink alcohol? Are you unable to fall asleep without drinking? Persistent insomnia is a real sign of alcohol addiction. Do you need more and more alcohol to get that buzzing feeling that you’d get after two drinks just a while ago? Having high tolerance to alcohol is another common sign of addiction.