Is Alcohol a Stimulant or Depressant?

Depending on your specific situation, you may not readily be able to tell if alcohol is a stimulant or a depressant. Drinking alcohol brings about a myriad of emotions for people. Some people feel peppy and uppity, while others struggle with anxiety and depression. Scientifically, alcohol is a depressant, but it is more complicated than that. Alcohol enhances the mood you are already in for most people. If you were happy before you started drinking, you may be excited and giddy when you drink. However, if you were sullen or angry before you had a drink, that mood may only get worse. The only way to stop alcohol from controlling the mood you show everyone else is to stop drinking altogether.

Is Alcohol a Stimulant?

Alcohol does have some stimulating effects. Many people who drink wind up with higher heart rates and lower inhibitions, making them appear to be more energetic. However, that is not a simple way of defining what alcohol does to the body. Instead, it is just some of the effects that some people go through whenever they have a drink in their system. Alcohol will speed you up for a short time after having a drink, giving you a tiny bit of energy. However, once you settle into your second or third drink, the depressant effects begin to kick in. Your body will slow, which is why falling asleep is so easy when you have been drinking.

Is Alcohol a Depressant?

Detoxing from Alcohol at Home

As of 2018, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism reported that 15 million people in the United States have alcohol use disorder. As a chronic and relapsing brain disease, alcohol use disorder, or AUD, involves the compulsive use of alcohol, a loss of control over the amount of alcohol taken in, and an emotional state that is negative when not using alcohol.

Whether a person faces binge drinking, heavy drinking, or dependency on alcohol, it is very difficult to overcome an AUD. However, it is also extremely important for that person’s health and wellbeing. Unfortunately, quitting is not an easy process, and people who drink a considerable amount of alcohol are at risk of experiencing withdrawal symptoms.

Some people looking to overcome an alcohol use disorder choose to detox from alcohol at home. While this may be the only option for some, it is not the recommended method according to Alcohol.org, a resource from the American Addiction Centers. Keep reading to learn more about alcohol detox at home.

Alcohol Addiction and Covid-19

Many of us have been spending a bit more time on social media lately. Those of us that have will no doubt recognize the memes and posts jokingly pointing out the increased drinking that our friends, families, and coworkers are splashing all over their walls and feeds. While a lot of that is meant in jest, pointing out the frustrations that rise from boredom and the like, it does highlight yet another side effect of this Coronavirus pandemic – that addiction is taking hold in places that it never would have had this Covid-19 crisis not happened.