Suboxone for Opioid Addiction Treatment – Benefits & Risks

Heroin is a highly addictive substance and use carries a number of risks including overdose and contracting communicable diseases. In an effort to reduce the number of overdoses and the spread of untreatable communicable diseases associated with the use of heroin and other opioids, pharmaceutical companies have developed drugs that interact with the brain similarly to opiates but do not carry the same risks. Suboxone is the brand name for one of the pharmaceutical drugs used for opioid addiction treatment.

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a medication that is a combination of 2 different substances: buprenorphine and naloxone. These substances react with the same receptors in the brain as opioid drugs. Naloxone will block the opioid receptors and prevent an overdose where buprenorphine will suppress cravings and limit the euphoric high associated with opiate use. When someone takes Suboxone they will essentially get a high that is less than heroin or fentanyl, they will not have the same cravings, and they will be much less likely to overdose. There is also a limit to the euphoric effects of suboxone so taking more will not produce a greater high. This removes the benefits of abusing the drug.

The Heroin Journey

“What’s going to happen to me?” It’s one of the most common questions we hear when the heroin addiction treatment process is in its beginning moments. And that makes perfect sense! Something that your body depends on to feel “good” and “normal” isn’t going to be available anymore. What does that mean for you? What will your body and mind go through? And what does a treatment facility do to help in that process?

While everyone’s treatment journey is unique, a few generalities exist. These include things that can be highlighted to help answer some of those burning questions about your journey from addiction to recovery, and what happens in between.

How Quickly Can You Recover From Heroin Abuse?

It’s notoriously hard to recover from heroin abuse and addiction. There are happy stories about heroin recovery, but often, the stories are disheartening. How long it will take you to recover from heroin depends on a number of factors. Individuals dragging the chains of heroin addiction tend to suffer for years without relief and those who have apparently recovered are vulnerable and prone to relapse at any time, but with the right motivation and treatment—recovery is possible.

Why Heroin Addiction is so Difficult to Treat

Heroin withdrawal symptoms may vary among addicts, and various factors can affect how long they’ll last, but they’re extreme and incredibly uncomfortable in general. It’s often said that heroin withdrawal is like flu on steroids. The symptoms of withdrawal hit them with such an intense force that all they want to do is get back to the drug. Therefore, most people can’t make it through detox alone.